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REGULATIONS

Hydrocarbon Refrigerant History

Are HCs totally new refrigerants?

Natural refrigerants are naturally occuring substances which have no Ozone Depletion Potential and very low or zero Global Warming Potential. Propane (R290) has a long history in refrigeration. It has been in use since before ozone-depleting CFCs were developed and was re-introduced for use in heat pumps after the CFC phaseout. Its thermodynamic data, efficiency, and material compatibility are well known.

Hydrocarbon refrigerants were first envisioned by Albert Einstein and he tried to patent three different types all involving hydrocarbons. The Einstein refrigerator was an Albert Einstein invention that was patented in 1930. It was co-invented with Leo Szilard who was one of his physics students at Zurich University. The invention was licensed to various companies.

The very first refrigeration systems ever built used natural refrigerants such as Ammonia (NH3), Hydrocarbons (HCs) and Carbon Dioxide (CO2). After the invention of CFCs in 1929, the industry all but forgot these original gases, but the Montreal Protocol in 1987

changed all of that, forcing the large chemical companies to invent the alternative Hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) gases.

Although HFCs do not directly deplete the ozone layer, they are powerful greenhouse gases. These gases are regulated by the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, and increasing pressure from subsequent regulations and emissions trading systems will force the industry to go

back to the same roots that it started from.

The natural refrigerants industry (i.e. hydrocarbon refrigerant industry) stands ready to deliver the range of solutions we need to keep cool without cooking the planet and destructing ozone layer. With on-going innovations the industry offers technologically

mature, commercially feasible and climate friendly solutions.

REGULATIONS

IMPORTANT INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONS ON THE PROTECTION OF OZONE LAYER

REGULATIONS IN INDONESIA